How Improving Your Home Can Improve Your Well-Being

How Improving Your Home Can Improve Your Well-Being_thoughtful

A long time ago, people used to think the body and mind were two separate things. These days, people have realized that the two are connected so deeply that what happens to one directly affects the other. In other words, you cannot try to improve the health of just one.

 

That’s why many people are making improvements to their home, not to expand space or increase its value, but to improve their well-being. With the right remodeling, your home can support your overall wellness. Here’s why that’s so important.

 

The Importance Of Your Well-Being

Again, your mind and body are linked. For example, being stress out and anxious a lot can depress your immune system, making you more prone to catching colds and taking longer to get past them. However, the reverse is true. If you’re eating poorly and not getting enough exercise, your stress level tends to go up.

 

This is why wellnessis so important. Once you accept how your mind affects your body and vice versa, you better understand how to stay physically and mentally healthy. However, your wellness can be in jeopardy, not because you’re stressed or don’t exercise, but due to your home environment. Even with working a lot of hours, you end up spending a lot of time at home. If it’s not supportive of your overall well-being, you could be getting sick or stressed more often.

 

Creating Positive Spaces

Then what can you do at home? Besides eating well and getting enough sleep each night, you can create a positive space. As Sensory Six explains, these are rooms or spaces where you can work on your well-being through exercise and relaxation2. To do this, pick somewhere in your house such as an unused bedroom. Select neutral colors and textures inside the room, then make sure the space is organized and uncluttered. Finally, add elements to allow you to exercise and meditate such as a yoga mat or some good books to read.

 

Instead of making any permanent changes, The Huffington Post says you can create a mini wellness retreat3 in your own home. Start by reserving an entire day or even a weekend for this. Create an agenda that includes wellness-boosting activities like low-impact exercise, meditation, and healthy meals. Then turn off your phone and stick to your agenda. This can help boost your overall wellness so your mind and body are healthier.

 

You can do the same on the outside of your home by utilizing low-water landscaping called xeriscaping. Knowing you’re lawn and plants are using less water can boost your self-esteem and happiness.

 

Improving Health & Safety

However, changes to your home to promote your well-being aren’t just about positive spaces. Your entire house is your home, and it can have a negative effect. That’s why you need to look at improving the health and safety of your home.

 

For example, Angie’s List talks about the dangers of lead paint4. Although it’s not used anymore, older homes could still have this on the walls, maybe even below a coat of new paint or wallpaper. If you have an older home, speak to a lead-certified contractor.

 

You also have to worry about your home’s air. Bustle recommends getting an air purifier5 to reduce allergens and pollution inside your home. This can help reduce physical and mental health problems, as you won’t be reacting to air-borne particulates as much. You should also consider getting rid of your carpets, as they tend to collect the same particulates and allergens you want to remove from your home.

 

Plan Some Changes Today

It can be easy to forget about things, so start planning today on how you can improve your home to improve your well-being. Create a positive space, host your own wellness retreat, and make sure your home is free from air pollution and allergens. Your home should be your refuge; it just takes a little work to get it there.

 

References

Molinaro, Judy. “Why Is Health & Wellness So Important”. JudyMolinaro.com. Web. August 8, 2017

2 Sensory Six. “Creating Wellness Spaces at Home and at Work”. SensorySix.com. Web. August 15, 2017

Oswald, Randy. “7 Simple Steps to Create an At-Home Wellness Retreat”. HuffPost. The Blog. Web. September 11, 2015. Updated December 6, 2017

Pogue, Paul F. “Lead Paint Safety: What You Need to Know”. Angie’s List. Web. October 10, 2016

Wolff, Carina. “11 Ways to Make Your Home More Healthy, Because Your Environment Matters Too”. Bustle.com. Web. July 11, 2016

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