15 responses

  1. Avatar
    Rosalie Stafford
    July 22, 2018

    I live in Arizona surrounded by thousands of square miles of creosote (aka chaparral). It’s a hardy plant, growing up to five feet high, & easily survives our summers: four months when the temperature crests 120F. After a rain, the wholesome, oily green scent of creosote wafts across the desert. I go out & carefully harvest small amounts & make teas & tinctures & have no fear of ingesting the bounty of the desert. I strongly suspect that Pharma’s warnings against creosote stems not from concern for anyone’s health but for concern that people will start taking their health into their own hands & stop taking the poisons that Pharma pushes. To back this up, I cite the experience of my best friend who, for years, worked in Pharma clinical studies. She told me that she was instructed to fudge the findings to reflect favorably on Pharma (I won’t mention names).

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    • Avatar
      Andrea Lewis
      July 22, 2018

      I’m not surprised. The pharmaceutical industry has been trying to take down natural medicines for close to 100 years now. They’re the reason medical schools no longer teach future doctors about nutrition and herbal medicines.

      Thank you, for commenting!

      Reply

  2. Avatar
    Diane
    September 16, 2018

    I would like to know where I can acquire chaparral pills?

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    • Avatar
      Andrea Lewis
      September 16, 2018

      Hello Diane. Yes, PennHerbs.com sells chaparral capsules in addition to the cut herb. HTH

      Reply

  3. Avatar
    JTB
    September 17, 2018

    I would like to know how I can get chaparral sent to me. I dont see anywhere on this site where I can order

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    • Avatar
      Andrea Lewis
      September 17, 2018

      Hello. We do not sell chaparral, but you can purchase the cut herb and veggie capsules from Pennherb.com. I’m certain MountainRoseHerbs.com also sells chaparral but they tend to charge more for shipping than Penn. HTH

      Reply

  4. Avatar
    Stella
    January 13, 2019

    Hi, I just received a packet of Chaparral herb. My intention was to collect all the other herbs to make some “Black Salve”. Although since I have it, I wanted to try some as a tea. I wonder if a pinch would be enough for one cup of tea or maybe two. I do dare!
    Thank you
    Stella

    Reply

    • Avatar
      Andrea Lewis
      January 13, 2019

      Hi Stella. You only need 1/4 tsp to 1/2 tsp (measuring spoons) of chaparral per 8oz of boiling water. Hope that helps.

      Reply

  5. Avatar
    Larry
    January 22, 2019

    I steep a full tablespoon of chaparral + 1 tablespoon of ground coffee with about 16 oz of very hot water for 20 minutes and drink everyday. It has not hurt me, and keeps me healthy.

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    • Avatar
      Andrea Lewis
      January 24, 2019

      Thank you, for sharing your own experience with Chaparral, Larry. It’s appreciated.

      Reply

  6. Avatar
    Kris
    January 10, 2020

    In your article you mentioned that you use a chaparral mix (with other herbs?). Do you know of a mixture that’s available to buy? I deal with gallstones, chronic pain from and lyme disease, among other issues that stem from the lyme. I know I also have heavy metal build up (who doesn’t) so I think this sounds like a good fit for me. I prefer holistic treatments, so have been treated for the lyme for almost a year holistically and am feeling so much better now, but the damage it has done to my joints will probably be ongoing.

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    • Avatar
      Andrea Lewis
      January 10, 2020

      Hi Kris. I don’t know of any prepared mix of chaparral with the herbs I use but, in any case, you may be better off doing the blending yourself. That way you’ll know you’re getting the herb to herb ratio you prefer. Also, if you want a singular treatment for heavy metal buildup activated charcoal would be an excellent choice. I hope this helps.
      If you have any other questions let me know.

      Reply

  7. Avatar
    jim murray
    March 10, 2020

    In Tucson,Az. they had a company that cut and pressed creosote . It was used to coat telephone poles, railroad ties. E.P.A. banned it.

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    • Avatar
      Andrea Lewis
      March 10, 2020

      Yes, the EPA did ban the use of creosote. However, chaparral (aka Larrea tridentata, aka creosote bush) is not the same creosote banned by the EPA for use as a pesticide.
      That creosote is a category of carbonaceous chemicals formed by the distillation of various tars and pyrolysis of plant-derived material, such as wood or fossil fuel. The most commonplace of these creosotes are called coal-tar creosote and wood-tar creosote.

      Thank you, for commenting!

      Reply

  8. Avatar
    Elisa
    April 22, 2020

    Chaparral Cleanse (a very safe way to use chaparral):
    I used to teach a Healers’ Training, one of which went four years. It was an amazing time, sharing a huge body of information and practice, much of which came from my years of study at the Center of the Light. The teachers there had a tremendous amount of experience as holistic healers working with people with all kinds of conditions. One cleanse that came out of that, I believe, is relevant to our times. Since you use one teaspoon of herb for three days, it is also inexpensive. I share it with you with all of the standard disclaimers:

    Chaparral Cleanse

    Chaparral herb (creosote bush), is a powerful liver and blood cleanser, that has been used to clear pathogenic organisms, chemicals, and emotional negativity and to help make important changes in one’s life. It helps to clean out infections, parasites and pollutants, cancer, HIV, chemical poisoning, heavy metals, and old drugs stored in the system.

    Do this for 21 days. You can wait one week and do again, if desired.

    Drink lots of water. Generally 3 – 4 quarts of water per day works well.

    Use an herbal laxative or enemas to keep your body cleaning out well if necessary.

    Pour 2 cups of lukewarm water over 1 teaspoon leaves and steep overnight. Do not heat. (The leaves can be reused twice.)

    Drink 1 cup of the tea, 2x during the next day, first thing in the
    morning and once again between meals or before bed. Most people find the taste quite awful, so you might want to chase it with a bit of raw honey.

    Use the same leaves two nights longer. The tea will not be as strong, but will have different properties. After the third day, start with a fresh teaspoon of leaves.

    Emotions may be re-experienced during this time — particularly anger. Do not be overly concerned with processing them. They are on their way out.

    Reply

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